Dignity for Life

 

      flyerWeb.jpg It’s a fact of life that as we age, the older we get the more friends we lose to death or illness.  Our children, grandchildren and even great grandchildren have full and busy lives of their own and tend to spend less and less time with their elderly relatives.  For those elderly that live on their own, it can lead to a very lonely existence.  Spending time with the elderly in any way can greatly improve the quality of their lives both mentally and physically.  As an advocate of protecting the sanctity of life, we must remember that we are not here just to advocate against abortion, we are advocating for the sanctity and dignity of life from conception through natural death.  It is the opposite spectrum of life that we tend to forget about or try not to think about.

       There are many simple ways that groups can advocate and help with the elderly both in their homes and in nursing homes or assisted living centers:

  • Befriend a senior citizen.  Ask questions about their interest; tell them about your interests.  Learn something from them and teach them some new things.  Be patient.
  • Organize a “senior” citizens’ prom at a nursing home or for a senior citizens group.
  • Have a talent show or musical program for residents at a nursing home or assisted living center.
  • Make emergency packets with flashlights, batteries, water, food packets, etc., for elderly in times of need such as storms or electricity blackouts.
  • Organize a Bingo evening or game night, or stop in often to play card or board games .
  • Perform yard work including weeding, mowing lawns, raking leaves, and shoveling snow .
  • Give a senior citizen a plant and stop by often to help take care of it.
  • Make seasonal decorations for rooms.
  • Clip coupons, often the elderly are on a tight budget.
  • Record and write down stories and memories about his/her life.
  • Organize and label their pictures in albums or scrapbooks to preserve memories of people and places.
  • Read a magazine or the newspaper to them; discuss current events.
  • Write letters or send email to their families for those who can no longer write.
  • Conduct small home repairs.
  • Make lap blankets, quilts or afghans.  Many senior citizens are often cold no matter what the temperature.
  • Take them for a walk if they are able, or offer to take wheelchair bound elderly for a walk.
  • Send greeting cards to them often.
  • Celebrate birthdays and bring a cake.
  • Take them to the grocery store, doctor visits, shopping, etc.
  • Bring your pet to visit if allowed.
  • Bring children to visit.  Children bring a lot of joy to the elderly especially if their own grandchildren live far away.
  • Prepare meals and deliver them, or invite them to your home for lunch or dinner.
  • Hug them!  Many do not have family close by and they need to know that they are loved.
  • Be a good listener and be patient.  Many people often believe that because a person is elderly, hard of hearing or slow to respond that they are of diminished mental capacity and tend to treat them like a child.  That is most often not the truth.  Their dignity is just as important to them as yours is to you.

 

       As a pro-life group, church or other organization, you can form a committee and create a schedule of activities that you can do together either at private homes or at nursing homes or assisted living centers.  At the very least, you should encourage your members to do some of these activities on their own on a continuing basis and to report back to the group at scheduled meetings.  By talking about what members have done, it encourages others to participate.

      As with the chronically ill, there are countless ways to be of support to senior citizens.  If applicable, prepare bulletin announcements and news releases pertaining to the activity you do and share your ideas with others to encourage participation. 

 

Downloadable and editable bulletin announcements, flyers, press releases and more are available to associate members through the Right to Life of Northeast Ohio program manual.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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